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*' To me, indeed, I frankly avow, the principle of malntaloing Order and regularity in the church, by the casual and indiscrin£ Dating agency of the common informer, appears to be founded on e Qm|i|^ sfiisconception and ignorance of the nature and ends of eccvsiasticai government and discipline. We now pro- ceed to c^l I a few flowers from his English. •' that the whole body of Homer's poems pre^ent^ even at this distant period, no very iiiporrect speciinfn of whi^t they were ia ancient times. Johnson properly defines a specimen to be '* a part of any thing exhibited, that the resit may be known.*^ Now certainly as the lliadi m its preser^t state;, contains a goo4 deal more thap Homer himself wrote^ it can scarcely be called a specimen of that poem. - * *.* *eipg convinced by the pr*^ ceding extract that these great and important schools would not have found^a-ntorc pious or hearty advocate than the worthy 9e-* cretary whp thus undertook their cause. The Apostle, in this part of his epietle, is exhorting the Christians whom he address* ed, to bring forth the genuine fruits of their faith, by living, not after the flesh, but after the spirit.

A public domain book is one that was never subject to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. sian Prize £ss»^ by " Franfc$.............;n^ Baptismal Regeneri Eidon;! PAGE Batchelor*s Journal, a No- vel, by Miss Byron .... • 3^3 Holy Spirit, Faber on the Ordinary Operations of the 337, 52$ Hopkinson's Religious and Moral Refl ctions .... Ku^« sel^ who^ may i|ow assuredly, qs far as Greek ^nd JL^tin are foncemed^ si|bstantkit6 his charge aigains^ his fieighbours 2|t Edhiboirgli^ of having lu4t *^ an indifferent appamtus for griodini." I* I II ■ i|i II 1 '»^i^^^mm»r-m^m^rmmmm^ Aet. Magn4 Britannia ; btin^ a Concise Topogravhicdl Accout H iff the several Counties of Great Britain, J&y the Rev. If in such instance that peace of min Jt, v\4iich it is their first effort to dissipate and to destroy, should be sigaiii restored, the labours of the Christian Advocate will not havtj - bp€u expended in vain.

Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. 658 Battle of Neville's Cross, a Poem •%••%• •••••^•» t SI^\ Belsham's Letters to tke Bishop of London . • • 623 Benet and Coxe on Com- " mutation of Tythe 113 Bishop of London, Charge ofthe ,••••.%•......•• 1 sham's Letters to 623 Boschini's Translation of Eloisa to Abelard 309 Bosnian's balance for weigh* ing a Com Law .;•••. on the Financial System of Great Britain 38 Brighton, Case of the Free ' School at ••••••»••••• 86 ^chana D's -Edition of Smith's Vealth of N^* tions .'*... 305 Hutton*s Recreations in Ma- thematics 409 I and J. It is our earnest hope, that this short but most able and coa-» vincing essay may meet with an extended circulaiion, as in these dajs it-may be producti\*e of much utility, and way.

by Cfpel Lqfd 262 Laurence's TABLE OF BOOKS REVIEWED. Sermon on Baptismal Regeneration 549 Le^ures on Apocalyticul Epistle S) by Kittle 300 ■■■ y Bampto Hy by Dr. Has he heard nothing of thd Eleati inscription^ found by Sir W. account of an excursion in 1755, speaks of it * as being then in no little danger,^ the sands being spread all around it.* It stood among the sand-hills, with only a solitary cottage near it, half buried In sand, and the porch frequently so blocked up that it was difficult to obtain en« trance ; it was determined therefore, about ten years ago, to build a liew church near the village of Lambourn, and the centre of thi^ Ctrish. \yhen we visited Perran-Sabuloe in that year, the fomier church, which had been unroofed was nearly filled with sand.'' P. Had the etymology of the names of places been inserted^ as they occurred^ it would have been a useful and pleasant addi«» tio D« This omission, indeed, is much to be regretted, as the old Cornish names are, for the most part, accurately descriptive of the places themselves, and not unfrequendy present a local mi- mature to the mind's eye ', many of the following terms will folly justify our remark : Bumuka Uf the high hil L Treoerbynj the dwelling on the hill. Thus thea no one can be positively certain that he receives a particular im«^.

70 Letter to the Duke of Kent, on Consumption, by Dr. Will it be credited that any one, who calls himself a Greek Professor, should have sufiered to escape him such a mixture of positiveness and ignorance as is contained in the following words, p. " But even though the digamma or Ionic vau have been used by the Greeks, still I asseit that it must have disappeared before the time of Homer." tiysom* Magna Br Unnmg, Cofmma^ t% What docs he mean hy disappearing f Have we not the express testimony of the ancient grammarian Trypho, that Alcaeus wrote Fp^if for pin^s} Did he never hear of the De Kan marble^ in whicli are the words TO AFYTOAie O ? Piran in which his relics were fcareftllly preserved : there was a great resort of Pilgrims to make oblations at this shrine, as appears by a deed in the registry of the see of Exeter, bearing date i4e H5» The brook above-mentioned* having been dried up by the adits made from time to time for the purpose of working the mines, the new church lost all the protec- tioii it could have derived from it and Borlase ; in a MS. 85 gathorized by Scripture to refer this or tl)at particular feeling of his mind, decidedly and unequivocally, to the Holy Spirit.

We would not have tfat clergy immersed in secular pursuits^ but we would have them thoroughly acquainted with every kw which prescribes their duty, and concerns their interest; wliich may easily be eflected by the possession of the volume which the Bishop so judiciously recommends. Polwhele's History of Cornwal U where he will find much information in this curious and entertaining part of provkicial etymology.

14^ Translation of Elolsst to Abelard, by Bosclilni .... Adanis 314 Tythes, Behet and -Coxe on Gopmutation of • . But| however secure tbey may be iu most cases from annoy* ance as long as one malignant heart esist Sj which either ava- rice or hostility may induce to make the attack^ their security cannot be considered as permanent. The reader who wishes to enter into this part of the subject more at large, will do well to consult Mr.

Google This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project to make the world's books discoverable online. Storer • • • • 103 Hitchener*s Towers of Ra- venswold, a Novel .... It seem3 to b^ with philology as with philosophy^ iri which science, says Cieero^ there is no opinion so absurd^ buf that son^e person or other hath advanced it. Dunbar se* riously argnesj that Homer could not have used the . The full, clear and most satisfactory state* luent of the fallacy and M*dity of pnteiuled carls aiid .

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. • Van Mndertf J:....:, ^St Baptism of John, a^ Norri* « .. Sfeiv Mathe^ xnatical Taolei 665 Satchelojria TABLE OF BOOKS REVIEWED. 101 ' Hobhouses Journey through Albania 611' Holland, Chads Narrative of the Revolution in . Xolic digamma because he wrote in the /ottic dialecti We crave leave to transcribe^ for his edification^ the following remark of Mn Hemmna from a sm^U pamphlet printed at Leipzig^ in 1807 t ^ AI)horret» inquiunt hi» ah Upmero, acriptore lonico^ Mo)icm (iterae usos* Id qui pripus dixit, perjocum^ ut opino^n dixit : sed arripuerunt ai U, et vel conviciis pro ea opiniooe pugnant. Multiis arg^mentis QOguoscitur, i«t4 litera non ^olos usos esse i Eo Ienses, sed Dqrienses omnes ; et esse h\inc usun; ade^ f Uiti^uum, ut initio universae Uraeciae communis fi^isse videatur/' In p« ^, Mr. '^ thinks it 'extremely probable^ that th^ ancients run the words more into each other than we do." But \xe bave alreiftdy devotee) to (he consideration of this triflit^ ^nd pompous pro4i|Ctioii a larger share of paper than it deserves. Professor l)unbar in future to stay at faome^ or to come abroad in a niore modest guise^ we co D^gn ham over to the frilly care of the Reverend Mr. emotions which we have thus extracted at large, uuiy perhaps have its desired effect, should it meet the eye of one upon whom the emissaries of the fanatical party arti just commencing their ii K BJdious experiments.

Any future sufferings which they may endure for the neglect of formsj. We are persuaded that the Sermoit before us must have had much effect in promoting its sac^d ob- ject, 'i^ie anci(^nt mode of catechetical instruction is enforced with much piety and zeal ; iand the words of so experienced a pastor as JL)r. Christian Advocate in the Univers Uy of Lnm* bridge^ ani Dom^^tic Chaplain to his Grace the Archbishop 0f, Canierbu Tjj, Bvo. JANVAli V, 181^ butto.tbe' office^ which he ho Id«« The present publication also com^s froi^i Uis pen as Christian Advocate/ whose duty it is. foundations upon which i|* is generaily mah Uained*-'the authority of Scripture^ and the per^ sonal^experience of many devout Christians ; though as he ob^ ^erves, tlie first ground is comparatively neglected ; the Scripture being generally broiigbt to'^confinn the feeling; and not- the feel* ing to fulfil the Scripttire. fle secondly adverts to those texts, from which it ha&' sometimes been supported.

76 Thorhhill's Poems So Y Towers of Ravenswold, k Nri Vel, by W. We must also declare, that after this zealous apd affectionate exhortation irom the Bishop upon so important a pointj that any such negligence or disregard for the timie to come is even criminal, as involving not only their own indivi* dual ruin, but, by the sufferings and degradation of its members^ shaking the temporal security of the establishment itself. religious light, that it woidd be an object worthy of the interference of the legislature to effect. By private hands however has the goodly seed been sown, and yve trust that it will be nurtured by the same pious care, till it reaches itsr perfect gi'owth. The office of Christian Advocate hns grown, titider the hftnds of its present possessor, into a situation of much dignity and im-i portance. DOyly has shewn in confoutiding the wretched sophistries of pert and perti- Cr V uacious VOL, III. D; first brings Ibnvard thos^ passages in Scripture wbiclr appear so strongly to reprobate that temper of mind which th^ doctrine of assurance must inevitable produce^ and fairly con- eludes that the general purport of Scripture is strong and decisive against it.

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