Intimidating color

Dijkstra and Preenan just advise that researchers be careful to account for all contributing factors when investigating color-associated winning biases in sports.“We do believe in the effect of red,” said Dijkstra. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of Phys Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission.While some studies have found that, indeed, certain colors may increase the likelihood of winning in combat sports, a recent study shows that researchers must take into account potentially confounding factors when associating color with winning probability.

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“Red is associated with anger, fear and failure in human societies; in many animals red increases the likelihood of winning. The content is provided for information purposes only.

Yet, the findings of Hill and Barton (in 2005) that athletes in red win more often in four combat sports requires a re-evaluation, because their analysis may also be confounded by similar factors as described in our study for judo. “No effect of blue on winning contests in judo.” Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Ultimately, experimental work is needed (also for the presumed lack of an effect of blue-white) to determine whether color biases winning in human sport.” : Dijkstra, Peter D.

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When correcting for these three factors, the researchers found that pitting blue uniforms against white uniforms was actually a very fair match-up.

They confirmed this result by analyzing 71 other major judo tournaments since 1996.

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“This holds, of course, for every single research project, no matter what it's about.

Surely, our findings are important for sport policy makers; blue-white most likely ensures an equal level of play, in contrast to blue-red.” However, the potential psychological effect of color in sport doesn’t end there.

Although the previous study tried to correct for the seeding by excluding first-round matches, Dijkstra and Preenen show that the seeding bias persists up through the third round of matches.

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