Fender squire japan strat dating

Given the modular nature of Fender production techniques, an individual neck may have been produced in a given year, then stored for a period of time before being paired with a body to create a complete guitar, perhaps, for example, in the following year.

Therefore, while helpful in determining a of PRODUCTION DATES, a neck date is obviously not a precisely definitive reference.

A serious amount of money was spent on advertising and sales went up drastically, which, from Fender’s perspective, was agood thing.

But, with more sales came more production, and more production meant less attention to details and a slumpingof quality-control.

As Forest White (then manager of electric guitar and amplification production at Fender) put it plainly,“Profit became paramount.”This work ethic clashed with what musicians wanted.

They were getting more poorly-made instruments as the years wenton and found they were still paying a high price for them.

Most specifications for a given Fender instrument model change little (if at all) throughout the lifetime of the model.

While there have been periods of dramatic change—such as the transition periods between the Leo Fender years and the CBS years or the transition between the CBS years and the current ownership—most models are generally feature-specific and do not change from year to year.

SERIAL NUMBERS were stamped on the back vibrato cover plate on early ’50s Stratocaster® guitars, and on the bridge plate between the pickup and the saddles on some Telecaster® guitars.

But once again, due to Fender’s modular production methods and often non-sequential serial numbering (usually overlapping two to four years from the early days of Fender to the mid-1980s), dating by serial number is not always precisely definitive.

Enraged at this deliberate copyright infringement, Fender threatened a lawsuit against many of these companies in the early 1980’s, forcing them to “cease and desist” production.

Many ceased (like El Maya, Heerby, and Joo Dee), but many desisted and kept making these sameguitars with minor changes to the logos and headstock designs. well, er, uh…So, Fender (under the direction of Dan Smith at the Fullerton Plant) started to really get things going prior to 1982 so thatthey could release their “vintage” line of reissue guitars, which are still being made today.

Pickups were unwoundand studied electronically, wood core samples were taken and exact dimensions of the woods were recorded.

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